FREEDOM // Samaneh Sadaghiani on leaving behind the business she founded and grew after 10 years.

FREEDOM // Samaneh Sadaghiani on leaving behind the business she founded and grew after 10 years.

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this is emily key loves the f word and today we are talking with semene saragiani about walking away from her company that she founded after a decade and the unknown that awaited her this conversation is really touching semene does not hold back she grew up in iran and moved to canada at the age of 13. the most awkward time in anyone's life let alone a new immigrant if you have ever felt lost aimless unsure of the next step then i'm certain you're really going to enjoy this conversation with simone i've loved every conversation that i've had so far on this series this one hit a little different because i too feel a bit aimless lost and a little unsure of what's next she shares her story of a rebellious teenager trying to fit in founding a business for the hell of it and learning leadership skills and how to collaborate with her partners again in every episode we wind up talking about this work identity and we hit on that here too the best part is that salmone left all this behind about a year ago in that year wound up going back to one of her first loves writing she has bared her soul and published a poetry book and it's really beautiful i hope you enjoy this conversation with samanie sadegiani i never liked school i didn't like people being like here's the way things are same i sucked at school because of that because i'm like who are you to tell me this especially because the more it as you say the more curious you are and i've always been very curious especially about people you talk to them and they all think differently and you can you know try to see things from all the different perspectives and then it leaves you in this place where you're like how could i ever know anything how are you sure about anything i feel like for me as i go through life there are different phases where i believe in something very strongly and then sometimes it melts away and you're like oh okay i was actually so wrong yeah and i think a big part of that is our own maturity age age maturity time experience the more we get exposed to the more we learn and my god i thought i knew everything when i was 14. oh yeah the confidence the hubris i would love to have that confidence yeah i'm trying to work on that my confidence is totally deflated i'm like how do i get a little just a little bit of that back that'd be great like you have to stop learning and just dig your feet in that sounds brutal right who was 20 year old salmone oh my god she was very cocky super confident i was a law clerk at the time actually funny enough i failed my careers class in high school it was a half credit it was so easy you just had to fill out these stupid personality tests and resume things and i just refused to do it because i'm like this is this is stupid i'm not doing it and my poor teacher i remember she got on her knees and she begged me she's like please hand in your assignment and for some reason i'm like not doing this i don't care about this i'm not doing it so i failed wow and even before that apparently my brother was very artistic from when he was a kid so he he would draw all the time and was into photography so my parents were like okay we know where he's going and they told me that they would look at me and that like she's not going anywhere in life like she's not interested in anything she hates school she you know i would study really hard i did well school in iran was just like so important you had to do well so i would just torture myself to actually get good marks but once i came here i think i got a little cocky because i remember in math class in grade seven i'm like i learned this in grade three so then i stopped paying attention and also because i was desperate to fit in so i just used school as this playground to learn how to navigate the culture and people here that would be very overwhelming though trying to navigate a new culture and excel anywhere in life being immersed in a totally new culture would be i imagine it to be imagined as a 13 year old how could you focus on anything else yeah well it was it was terrible you know i had the wrong clothes i my eyebrows were too thick my hair was in the right way i couldn't speak the language i remember for the first like couple months anytime the teachers would ask me questions i just like i don't speak english i've also been a huge talker in my life so within a few months i i've always had this need to connect with people so i had to i feel like in three months i started speaking english one of my friends asked me and then this other persian girl who had been in canada for i think six months or a year longer than me and she said how come she speaks english better than you do and the girl got so upset she's like because she talks too much poor girl i'm sure i got my my revenge i was nice but when people did me wrong in school i would like plot some sort of a scheme to get my silent revenge it was usually prank calls oh my gosh i used to get out the phone book with my brothers of three brothers and we would make a prank this is a thing our kids will never learn no it was the best activity oh yeah i came here at the end of grade seven which is also awkward to come at the end of everyone's already friends i had no friends in grade seven so would have been great to meet you yeah we would we would have hit it off i think sassy teenagers after high school you're supposed to pick your career i don't know why you're 18 you've got it all figured out yeah you're probably at your stupidest make a big choice here i was just kind of crippled by this decision and my grades weren't great i was just stalling like i don't know what i want to do i don't know what i want to study i've always wanted to be a writer but you know the whole world just tells you you can't make money writing i'm like okay i'll pick a respectable career so i'm like how can i pick something that incorporates writing i've always also really been interested in just people and history of things i think i applied for psychology anthropology at university and then i applied to some college courses which was television broadcasting radio broadcasting and i co i couldn't even think of another option so i asked my best friend what she was doing and she said oh i'm going to be a lock clerk i'm like okay i put that down and i submitted my application so late that everything was full or maybe because my grades were so that i got into the law clerk program which was my third choice i got in and in college i ended up making friends with older women and my posse was like the single mom and this married woman and this guy who had a fiance so they were serious i don't hear that often and i'm with you my favorite people are a solid decade older than me they just were the people that i always enjoyed being with yeah because they know they have so much to teach you right yeah they do so i had this posse who was serious about their career so i ended up actually doing really well it's all about who you surround yourself with all these cliches as you get older like why are they all true it's just it makes me angry like i made fun of these people who spoke in cliches but it's actually real i did well and i ended up as a law clerk and i was working in family law because that's what i chose i don't know why it's the most depressing i remember just sitting there one day like i loved my co-worker she was such a disturber too so we had all these amazing jokes my boss was great he looked like jack nicholson the clients were terrified of him i learned a ton from him i learned how to collect money i learned how to like talk to clients how to write emails that sounded professional but i was just sitting there i'm like i want something more creative you know it's the law everything's literally by the book and the book is so boring like okay i still have this voice that says just do something with writing it'll be creative and fulfilling so i think i took a personality quiz i like googled what career should i choose funny enough it was the same type of exercises that you did i didn't do in careers class jeez could have saved me so long it spits out a bunch of careers and one of them is advertising i'm like oh this seems interesting when i apply to this i found a creative advertising program that seemed like it had all the exciting things applied to that got in this time i was really engaged i was paying for it myself i was like going after my own dream of wanting to write for a living i met these two amazing professors there richard and lisa and they kind of became my school parents and the first adults to really believe in me because my parents had kind of given up i was getting into a lot of trouble didn't have direction you know they thought okay finally she has a job and she's going in this direction and i'm like nope start going back to school i gotta ask and i'll let's put a pin in creative advertising and school parents why were they so supportive of your brother and his artistic nature yeah but didn't necessarily afford you the same courtesy and is is that because you weren't clear or you weren't practicing it or were they just like no writing is not gonna work for you so i think i kept to myself a lot when i wrote and stuff they did a lot of the opposite of helicopter parenting so my dad was mostly at work and my mom had you know a lot of work to do all day so i was by myself a lot i wrote a story when i was in grade two and i showed it to my mom like probably caught her in the middle of like a story like mom read my story so she read it and what i remember her telling me was oh cool keep writing you'll be good one day and i was just devastated i just really wanted her to like it so it just broke my heart looking back she probably didn't say it like that my mom's not a monster but that's how i took it this whole growth mindset thing that's what i would say to my daughter oh you're doing great keep going and my daughter's like i'm great at math and i'm like you are doing a great job of learning and it's so interesting to hear you say how much that impacted you because now i need to rethink my whole strategy so i think i just stopped sharing my writing with her just out of fear of that dismissal they just didn't know what i was into when i was going through my identity crisis a few years ago around 2016 i called up my mom was like listen i need to know who i am what did i like when i was a kid she's like i don't remember and then she told me she's like i remember you like doing things slowly for a really long time like washing your socks i was like i don't know if this is helpful but i'll take it that's such a funny thing to remember you do though i do yeah and that's it's crazy because she said that to me and at this point this is i had graduated from advertising program in the middle of the recession the last one that we had no one was hiring me at agencies and i was full of that young hubris i'm starting my own advertising company knowing literally nothing about the industry pulled together a bunch of my classmates that i thought were smart and it's funny because all of them were like listen we should probably get some industry experience for five years and then tried this and i was like no the time is now oh my god and my school parents especially richard who was the one that was telling me like do it he was very entrepreneurial and he believed in me and i feel like that was the first time i really felt that an adult person that i looked up to believed in me and he just he pushed it he's like go for it and so we went for it you also sound like you enjoy learning by doing yeah i'm the same i i learned way more in starting and building my own company than i've learned anywhere else because i screwed up so many times yeah you have to learn you don't have a choice right exactly the stakes have to be higher for me to actually be like okay let's roll up the sleeves okay so you've you convinced your classmates well done now you have a business now i have a business and i have this like huge ego that thinks i'm an advertising agency now and so we're going around anyone that can listen to us and we're like okay we're pitching these big campaigns like all right we're going to do radio spas and a television spawn and a subway ad and they're looking at us like a bunch of kids i was 23 at the time i think my my youngest co-founder he was 19 18 or 19 19 i think oh but the gumption yeah i love it these are these are adults looking at us being like uh okay well it's a recession we need an online presence we're trying to like do things cheaply can you make a website or like yeah but what about this like television spot they're like okay here's the budget go make a website and so we had all grown up like as internet kids right geocities and angel fire and making our own brad pitt fan sites i still love him so much he's so hot so we started making websites we met these other bunch of kids who were trying to build do you remember groupon i think it's still a thing yeah back in the day so it was the first groupon competitor in canada that they were building and they were also kids they hit us up i think they wanted us to promote them so they're like hey can you make some flyers for us and hand them out at dundas square and we're like okay show us your website so we get an idea of the branding and they show us the website and it's like a static html oh wow that they had outsourced to india and they were like this is the site and we're like oh that is not a website that's not going to work you're going to need a way to upload deals there's like this whole other part of it i think it was like three nights that we didn't sleep and just redesigned this website and we pitched them this branding and website and they loved it so much that they're like okay let's find you guys can do our site then we're like we have to actually know how to do this so then we started to you know reach out to friends we knew who were coders and from there we hit this like collective buying craze where every single person in toronto was picking up the phone and calling us because we had negotiated to have a link that we made the site at the bottom of their website and they started to do really well and people were calling us like hey can you build us a clone of that and we're like uh yeah so we built maybe like a dozen groupon clones wow and in that process learned so many lessons of like okay you can have a team of juniors trying to build these businesses for people and you know you're intimidated by the salaries of let's say a senior developer who can come in and literally save your life so we're like but we can get like four juniors for this price sometimes you do get what you pay for exactly and so that was a really tough lesson we had to kind of change the structure of our company let go of all these junior people we had bring in some people who actually knew what they were doing and have them help us build a team and i think just throughout my career in tech and when we had to pivot to be a web company it was just being at the right place at the right time and the right people talking about us to the right people so we started to get projects that were just bigger and bigger we did blog teo which led to random house which led to chorus entertainment which led to rbc so then we were doing serious business and we're like holy crap how did this happen and how did 10 years go by so yeah it was a it was a wild ride no kidding so tell me about the end oh the end i feel like i waited three years too long for the end the end was i left my company in december yeah holy crap it's been a year happy anniversary thank you thank you crazy a year so you so you built it for 10. you put a decade

yeah wow it was really hard to leave for my ego too because i was like this is my baby this is where i've put all of my effort into this is who i've become that would be really hard to walk away from yeah i feel like i grew up in that company with those people yeah when we started out you know we were all very similar we had a ton in common on the same kind of journey and from 23 to 33 you're a different human being and not just me they were too right we just grew apart in the last three years before i left i remember was one summer and i'm sitting at my desk and i just told myself i said you have three years because the 10 mark was this thing in my head that i said i want to stick this out for a decade like for some reason i just needed that number and and to like push myself figure out how to be content here or you have to leave for those three years the first year i was like all right i'm gonna align the partnership team and figure out our vision and let's go i started just working on that and just failed miserably because as an older sister i'm just used to being a dictator or was was i'm number three of four and i'm still definitely they look at me and roll their eyes when i go into my dictator mode maybe it's just like you're either born a dictator or not yeah it's a thing you can't really shake up so i went dictator mode the first first year and i think my biggest mistake was i was prescriptive in the way that i was trying to move us forward i would do a lot of the research on my own a lot of the thinking on my own and when you're trying to motivate people you have to have their buy-in right away right you build it together with them and you can guide the direction but you can't just walk in and be like here's a keynote i put together on why we should do this yeah and why we'll fail if we don't which is which was my style i would just like spend weeks collecting like data on our company presented back and just like i had had months to digest all this information make it make sense and i remember so many times i would run meetings just like pour my heart out have my proof up and then i would stop talking and it was literally crickets that's like me at dinner parties oh god it's such a bad feeling you're just you question your entire existence in those quiet moments have i lost my yes no i think people just need time to digest information that buy-in process takes forever for some reason in the type of work that i do often it's getting by and around change it takes forever and sometimes you can't get it often it's it's impossible and it's a great challenge people say what do you do i literally am just trying to convince people in all the different ways i can convince them to get to the outcome that i want or that the team sees as the best outcome yes the team yeah operations is hard it's if they don't know what operations is they're like oh ops you coordinate like oh that's cute that's cute all it tells me is they've never seen it done well and that's okay i i then i look forward to working with them and exactly that's why they pay you the big bucks some days so yeah when when they can recognize the need for a good operations person it's usually a second time founder who knows they need an ops person in early and then they call me yeah i was like the annoying one in my partner's group i got that feedback they called you annoying yeah because i was the ops person no that's a knife through my heart and then um one time i think i said annoying what do you mean and my partner told me he's like well we know we need a you but maybe when you say things to us say them in a way where when we hear it we go ah instead of huh i know and they want it to be their idea it is an art form it's exhausting it is it takes a lot yeah i thank you for respecting the art and science of operation i've lived it you have lived it yeah that's why i like you so much yeah man ops people we we gotta stick together we weep together we do at a specified cadence that we've all agreed on beforehand yes of course we'll be right back after this short break this podcast is brought to you by me and i do this podcast because i love learning from others i also write a newsletter every couple of weeks and share my thoughts on work and being a woman at work a few of my favorite recommendations for what to watch listen to and read you can sign up for the newsletter at emilykey.com [Music] all right let's get back to my conversation with samane i did that the first year of just going in with my powerpoints very strong and then i had to learn that i can't do that so i hired a coach a leadership coach that came in and was like all right let's teach you to collaborate and so we started with all the projects that i was trying to accomplish like agreeing on a vision like figure setting our goals you know getting people to agree to kpis and how to measure our performance moving forward and so she came in just such a boss as an entrepreneur i hadn't had a boss in like nine years by the time i hired her and so having somebody that was calling me out on my who wasn't one of my partners because by this time we were just butting heads so much we're not hearing each other anymore it's all about communication and any everything right any type of relationship so at this point we were just had these preconceived notions of who every single person was what their strengths were what we liked about them what we didn't and what was gonna come out of their mouth before it even came out of their mouth so we're kind of doing this talking to each other and she came in and she was like she showed me she just put up a mirror and she's like this is what you're doing this is why it's not working and i was like oh i changed my approach and i started to like sit with my partners and interview them and be like okay it's three years from now it's a thursday afternoon you wake up in the morning what's your life like and they all had different visions than me and so then i knew it was time to say goodbye because it was just by that time it became so obvious to me that there's this huge gap between us and we're literally going in opposite directions yeah that takes a lot to get there switching gears and trying something totally different and then going ah this isn't gonna work out the way i need it to and the courage to step away from something that you spent so much time building what was that like to to say goodbye how did you cope with that was it hard or were you were you so prepared after that three years of struggle it was so hard like i went into depression for months and months i had before told myself okay i'm gonna leave going to mexico i'm gonna take one month to just heal and move on from this experience and then i'm gonna hit the ground running and then month seven i'm still getting over it and it took me i think six and seven months until i had fully processed it and it was such a depressing and also stressful time because i didn't have the responsibility of running a business anymore and so i'm like my days are free what do i do with myself and i didn't know what i wanted to do next which was the biggest stress for me so i'd spend the year that i ended up taking off a third of it stressing and moping around were you kind of grieving would you call it that yeah 100 it's like a breakup yeah you know because these people had become my family you know we did everything together for 10 years saw each other every single day even though the work environment for us had become very toxic where we just weren't hearing each other and weren't respecting each other and supporting each other it was just still so hard to not be around them anymore and not have that identity of being like the owner of this business so then i'm like who am i which is why i called up my mom and like what was i like when i was a kid who this is so funny a few of the guests it's it's the same crisis who am i without my work where did you get to in that thought experiment it sounds like the first you know third was very mopey and and then they started to go what do i like what did you do when you couldn't procrastinate anymore by keeping yourself busy with this identity what did you do the pandemic was really helpful because what i needed to do was to slow down and i was just still running in my head just with anxiety and giving myself tasks you know i was doing so many like different exercises to figure out my next step and like really like had put this time crunch to try to figure it out and then it's the pandemic and the whole world slowed down i'm like okay well i can't really go anywhere i have to be slow and still which is something i hadn't been in so long i hadn't been present you know just constantly running through a to-do list in my head thinking about the next thing next thing next thing i just started to like practice not thinking about anything and just being here present slow do one thing at a time like if i'm eating something don't scroll on my phone i just i spend a third of it learning how to actually be grounded and present this final stretch so i feel like this is my final stretch of the year of retirement this this final stretch i've been just learning all the things that i've said i want to do one day i took a screenwriting course a songwriting course i'm learning how to sing i'm doing all this like stuff that i always just fantasize about like one day i'm gonna learn this one day i'm gonna do this i wish i could have started this from the beginning because this phase is sick do you really think you would have been able to oh hell no you had to rest and had to learn to slow down to be able to even find any enjoyment in some of these new things i had to be sad i had to rest i had to like allow myself to be okay not having anything to do and just you know i took a lot of walks by the water and just went and like sat in the grass and wrote or listened to something or dreamy stuff stuff that i would fantasize about when i was stuck working every day it was nice it was it was like this but yeah the pandemic's been super painful and in in trying to assign a silver lining to it i think the slowness the forcing of being present with who you're with uh or self or alone i'm definitely with you on trying to see that as a gift we're in such a rush all the time and i think ambitious women and women who want to do stuff and rattle cages and make big moves there's almost a guilt that is associated to not constantly improving or opting out of that achievement race i'm not articulating it well but you know we're so it's so deeply ingrained to okay what's next yeah how many people asked you what's next after you left they still do everybody and it's i know they don't realize what a terrible question that is well they're expressing a curiosity in your life but they're also you know we're all very wrapped up in this culture of work obsession yeah and that's great work is work is a lot of people's first love and i i get that i just i want to try on it maybe not being my first love yeah but then i'm going to say that and a potential client's going to listen to this and go oh she's not dedicated right like the anxiety that comes with that yeah like wow this is the people who are the most into it will be the most higher but i guess that's maybe just my fear i don't know i think you can be really good at what you do and not be completely obsessed with it i don't know but maybe that's not true i think it is i think the more space you give yourself to rest your brain to engage it in different ways when you return to your work you're refreshed you have new ideas you are less stressed because you haven't put all the steaks in this one basket so you're more clear i've realized you know my mom told me i liked washing my socks for a really long time i like chewing on a problem for a long time like i know i need at least a night to think about something in the afternoon and then do something else and go to bed wake up the next day and visit it and then i trust my decision but if i made the decision in the afternoon chances are i'm it's like driven from fear and anxiety we could all spend a lot more time thinking through and right now we're such a reactive high high stress high strong group of people i love that you have the self-awareness that you are better the decisions are better and more clear or more sound when you've taken the time to think through them that's so logical when i say it out loud it sounds dumb right yeah but it's like we're always so we value speed and i just i don't think that's going to work for me so i'm afraid i'm afraid i'm not going to be great anymore because i'm not as fast but i feel like it's maybe evolved and i'm i don't know i don't know if i hope so if i didn't meet the women that i did in tech i would have been ruined speaking of freedom like so much of my the beginning half of my career in tech i was just completely lost trying to live up to this idea of who i thought i needed to be to succeed which i thought was the people around me i was always trying to be them i'm not them no they're a bunch of dudes i am not dude you are not a dude i'm not a dude and it's it's funny again one of those things you say out loud you're like obviously you're not a dude but we try and mimic it totally as you said these other women in this community of of worker bees they were a life raft i would have i would be flailing even more than i already am if i didn't have a group of awesome women giving me real just dishing it to me oh yeah they get women just give it to you straight especially women in tech that i've met they're all just like say the thing right away to my face and i love that yeah me too that's not for everyone no in your year of retirement you wrote a book and i'm so glad that i have it and i've been enjoying reading bits and pieces of your poetry before i go to sleep can i read you my favorite one okay is it awkward if i read you poetry you wrote uh i think it's less awkward my favorite is weekend lover oh i i laughed i hurt i felt so many things in such a simple simple piece it's three lines i love it my weekend lover i need you the most during the week it's beautiful i love it thanks what's your favorite i think my favorite is unibrow so it goes um my eyebrows are lovers desperate for a connection they grow with all their might but my jealous hands keep plucking them apart oh my god i love that only you could turn that a unibrow into poetry we have had our struggles over the years you know i was feeling mushy towards her one day i'm like you know what you get a poem so when did you start to write this the poems in that book are from the last decade when did you decide you wanted to turn this into a book in 2018 i decided well as a kid i've always wanted to publish a book but in 2018 in the winter which coincided with when i was like it was my last year before my last year at my company i was like okay i need to get this out there i need to like create something else and so i started putting it together i completed about 90 of it and then i just casually chickened out i was like yeah you know this is kind of like publishing your diary i got a bunch of feedback on it i went through all these rounds of revisions and i just abandoned it in august i was having lunch with one of my friends who had given me feedback and he goes uh i spent hours giving you feedback on which poems to put in this book where the hell is your book and i was like ugh so the thing is and he's like no no no this isn't acceptable i'm gonna call you every week and you're gonna finish this and i'm gonna project manage this and you you just be the artist i was really excited because i hadn't been in this position in so long like someone else is gonna manage me amazing so he started calling me every weekend and he's like okay did you do the thing you said you were gonna do and if i have a deadline like i can't not meet it so i'm like of course i did the thing he's like okay what's the next thing i tell him the next thing and he's like he'd write it down hang up the phone call me again the next week that's awesome to have someone holding you accountable to that stuff especially because it's your it's something fun it's something personal and that's so we so rarely put that stuff out in the world yeah when you say dedicated to my biggest fan is are you is your brother sam are you dedicating it to yourself oh we're both no no it's my brother because i was like that's badass she dedicated her book to herself you're both santa okay you're 7a and he's yeah he's some oh my god i died laughing at that okay my other one which i thought was like you probably don't feel that this is feminist prose but i thought it was very feminist is length i am no longer ashamed of length the blank on the page is for you to off in and it made me think it's so beautiful i love it there's so much power in that and i think what i love about it most it it made me think of how women are so often apologizing or explaining or trying to justify or fill in the blank especially when we say no and i love that because i was just like i just i can see you going no and that just being it i just find that so powerful i love that one length is one of my favorites okay yeah i really like that one too i had it featured in an art show many years ago and i framed it and i cut the bottom of the frame and i just had this huge roll of paper that rolled on the ground and it was all blank except i gotta recreate it i never picked it back up i was just like so mortified to have my pieces shown i just never went back to get it i would hang it in my office can i purchase this it's amazing i'll make it for you i'll make it for you sweet guys this is how it's done will you do more of this will you write more will you keep writing yeah it's i can't it's the thing that i can't stop it's just my way of processing the world so i'll keep writing i don't know what type but poetry has been something i've written since i was a kid i'll probably continue maybe i'll write some songs and i want to write a comedy one day too like something just so stupid you know i haven't read poetry in a really long time and i spend most of my time reading you know business articles or business books or autobiographies and um it was very refreshing and healing to read nice poetry so thank you such a gift thank you for the support it's crazy it's like i published my diary and i just handed it to people i cannot i will be murdered if i publish my diary nope nope nope with this newfound freedom your last year where there's this nothingness before you you know you went through lots of different stages you went through grief you went through that quiet phase you went through this hungry to learn and try different things phase where is that bringing you to and you know was any of that were you afraid at any point or have you was that cocky teenager still in you going it's gonna be fine how are you looking at this freedom that's in front of you and that you're in there was so much fear for half the year but i think after that quiet period the thing that shifted in my mind is i am much more comfortable taking things one day at a time as long as i check in with myself and i see that like i'm all tuned up you know i've eaten i'm in a good mood i've exercised i've done all the things i needed to do then i can i'm open and receptive to opportunities whereas before i always had to have a plan i'm like okay this is what i'm working towards this year this is the first time i kind of don't have that grand life plan the only plan that i had which i'm making happen now is we wanted to move to a place that is better for hosting i wanted more space to host people or post pandemic that's kind of where my head's been at i just throughout my career i've connected with so many incredible people and have all these amazing talented driven people around me and so there's tons of opportunities for me to work with them or if i want to meet somebody within that group they kind of like know everybody which again this it's all about who you surround yourself with cliche that i i just swear by now like you gotta find good people find your people people who have your interests at heart that you can care for and they'll care for you back so i'm much more comfortable and not knowing whatever opportunities come i'm just gonna keep connecting with people i now know what my skills are and if there's opportunities for me to apply them i'll go in that direction and we'll see where we end up that's such an open way to think about things that's very optimistic and as a person who has spent just been stressed and thinking about more i think operating a little bit out of fear of the unknown you're a good reminder for me to keep thinking about that thank you so much for coming on the show i know we've never met and so i appreciate that you're even open to having you know quite a candid conversation with me thank you yeah of course you're you're super cool i was smiling for so long after our last call i'm like who is this woman where has she been i'm so grateful we were introduced that was that's the best part about these insane women who i meet on like twitter people are just like oh you should talk to so and so or have you talked to so and so and it's just that connecting it's lovely it's very lovely especially right now as we're all very virtual yeah it's it's nice to have a fresh perspective a fresh voice injected into your life too right because our circles have just shrunken so much well that's why i wanted to do this well and just hoping that people getting to listen in on the conversations i get to have with interesting smart women will help them feel a little bit more connected or maybe less isolated yeah that's really nice i love the concept thanks i don't know what i'm doing nobody does thank you so much for tuning into this conversation i really hope you enjoyed it don't be shy please rate and review this podcast so that other women can find it more easily thank you so much for continuing to tune in and to support i'm absolutely thrilled at the response it means so so so much thank you thank you thank you don't forget to hit the subscribe button so that you're the first to know when a new episode drops which will be very soon

2021-03-02 15:30

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